Jun 4 2015

Game of Thrones’ religious zealots and freedom lovers

maureen

AryaI’ve got a few musings on Game of Thrones. I noticed a couple of parallel themes concerning religious zealots and freedom. I have no idea whether this was intentional by the show’s creators or simply a projection of themes I’ve been pondering personally, but here are my thoughts:

Cersei possesses some of the qualities I find most reprehensible. She grasps for power, wealth and position. She manipulates, lies, and betrays to get her way and cover herself. Trying to use the Faith Militants to get at the Tyrells backfired. Now she’s locked in her own dungeon by the Sparrows, religious zealots who worship the Seven, until she confesses her sins. I’m not sure Game of Thrones could have done anything that would make me root for Cersei Lannister, but I find religious enforcers just as reprehensible as everything Cersei represents. Cersei is resisting and I’m pulling for her.

Forced confession and repentance is not confession and repentance at all. Making people comply to religious rules and bow to religious authority is not redemptive.

Melisandre takes compliance a step further.  She serves the Lord of Light that her religion teaches is the one true god. She uses sex as conversion therapy, has visions at the most convenient times, and, when those coercions fail, sacrifices those who won’t convert in a big bonfire. She’s convinced Stannis that he is the reincarnation of one of her religion’s legendary heroes and that her religious practices are responsible for his victories. She is now trying to convince Stannis that offering his daughter as the next human sacrifice is the only way to assure his next victory. I don’t know whether Melisandre is scarier as a true believer or a master manipulator. Is Stannis finally going to wake up?

The message “convert or die” is a sure sign that dark forces are at work no matter what the messenger calls the god.

Arya Stark goes to sleep whispering the names of heinous people who have hurt her and her family. The litany of names reinforces her hatred for the people on her list and her determination to see them pay. We pull for her. We want her to get revenge. But now she’s come to the House of Black and White, this strange cult that worships the many-faced god, a conglomeration of all the other gods worshipped in the GofT universe. They focus on the god of death in each of these other religions. They seem to believe that assassination is an act of mercy carried out as dispassionate religious ritual. Part of Arya’s training is that she deny her identity so she can learn to change her face and lie. Not all in, Arya hid her sword Needle in the rocks instead of disposing of it as she was told. Are the names fading? Is Arya the acolyte actually going to drink the kool-aid? I hope not.

If you are going to make a litany of the names of your enemies, maybe it’s more constructive to make it a prayer of goodwill for them. Forgiveness is freedom.

Tyrion and Daenerys had a heart-to-heart about compromise. Daenerys has been conflicted about how to implement her ideals as ruler. She’s rightly uncomfortable with the idea that she might be endorsing violence by allowing it. She’s already compromised and resorted to killing to establish her power. Now she’s got an advisor in Tyrion who is telling her she’s wise to continue on this course “for the greater good.” The alternative is to become the High Sparrow. This is an alliance that has some legs. Can’t wait to see what comes next for Tyrion and Daenerys.

Sometimes the cost of leading free people is to leave room for them to choose evil with the hope of leading them to choose good. It’s a tough and messy course.

Jon Snow, now leader of the Night’s Watch, allies with the Wildings to fight the White Walker invasion. He’s not out for power or to change their way of life. He’s offering a mutually beneficial alternative to all of them becoming wights, the GofT version of zombie servants of the Walkers. Could the head Walker, aka The Night King, be the long lost Benjen Stark from Season 1? Is Jon Snow’s demise going to the Ned Stark shocker for Season 5? I hope not. My theory is that Jon’s mother is a Targaryen and that Jon and Daenerys are the match that can win the game. If that doesn’t pan out my money’s on the Direwolves.

“Give me liberty of give me death” takes on a whole new meaning when being free means living on the other side of the wall.

Ask the Maester is great source of explanation for all things Gof T. Check it out.


Oct 12 2014

Looking at Gone Girl through a Johari Window

maureen


SPOILER ALERT:

Gone Girl reminded me of the Johari window. JohariWindowThe idea is that there are four panes in every relationship that adjust in size through the course of the relationship. As we get to know someone the open pane grows. The hidden pane shrinks as that person chooses to disclose things about himself. Over time spent together we gain insights into that person and earn the right to speak share our insights about him so that through knowing us his hidden pane gets smaller. One would expect that the open pane would grow very large in a marriage relationship.

Applying this model to Nick and Amy Dunne’s relationship is disturbing because Amy’s hidden and unknown panes are so large. Everything Amy thinks she knows about herself is informed by something in her hidden window. According to most psychologists sociopaths know that they are sociopaths. They are very good at hiding this from other people and often come off as charming. They are also great manipulators. Amy carefully controls what Nick thinks is her open self. She also uses her relationship with him to manipulate him both through what he’s revealed to her through the open pane in his relationship with her and through what she knows about him that he doesn’t know about himself. Rather than using that information to enhance and heal their relationship, Amy uses it to manipulate Nick into taking the fall for her murder.

Nick illustrates that we don’t have to be sociopaths to seek to manipulate others’ views of who we want them to think we are. Nick tries to control his open and hidden windows with Amy because of his affair, but next to Amy, Nick is a rank amateur at manipulation. He’s not really built for it anyway. Giving him a twin sister is an interesting choice because twins tend to have an empathetic connection that lets them into one another’s blind and hidden selves. Margo may not know the details but she senses when Nick is not open and honest with her, and the more open Nick is with her the greater clarity he seems to have. To a great extent this empathy is the key to successfully tracking Amy’s moves. Continue reading


Nov 29 2013

Of Rattlesnakes and Mockingjays: Sacrifice and Symbol in Catching Fire

maureen

It started with Benjamin Franklin more than 20 years before the revolution. The rattlesnake was chopped into eight pieces. It illustrated Franklin’s editorial about the “disunited state” of the colonies and was originally used to encourage the 13 colonies to unite and fight with Britain in the French and Indian war. Revolution was not on Franklin’s radar at that time, but after years of paying a less costly tribute than the 13 Districts of Panem, seeds of revolution took root and Franklin’s “join or die” snake began appearing all over Colonial America The snake metaphor was later recycled into the familiar coiled rattler on the yellow background known as the Gadsden Flag. The snake and motto appears on Navy SEALS patches. Variations of the coiled snake and motto have been used by various political groups as a symbol of protest.join-or-die

Gadsden-flag-original-Marine-flagMockingjay_on_fire                                                                                                       In the first Hunger Games, the thirteen Districts were concerned about themselves. Each one sent their Tributes and kept their heads down. Some trained their Tributes in hopes of assuring survival and gaining status but mostly they hoped the Capitol would accept the annual sacrifice and ignore them. But something happened in the year’s time between the co-victory of Katniss Everdeen and Peeta Melark in the 74th Hunger Games and the decision by the Capitol to bring them back for the 75th. What is the tipping point for revolution?

For the 13 Colonies it was Lexington and Concord. Fifteen years of griping about taxes and oppression came to a head when the British shed Colonist blood. The 13 Districts put up with the shedding of blood for seventy-five years, in a controlled way. Their revolution had failed and they were living with the Capitol’s bizarre vengeance. But they too have a tipping point.

Hunger Games author Suzanne Collins says that the ancient Greek myth of the Minotaur was her inspiration and that she views Katniss modern Theseus. According to the myth King Minos of Crete demanded fourteen young Athenians, 7 male, 7 female are paid in tribute. Athens paid to avoid war. Sending the young people into the labyrinth where he kept the Minotaur, Minos enjoyed blood sport with political motivation. That does sound a lot like President Snow. In the Greek myth, the demi-god Theseus volunteers to be one of the tributes and eventually defeats the Minotaur and saves the young Athenians.

Katniss is no demi-god, but, like Theseus, but she begins as a volunteer, a willing sacrifice in The Hunger Games. Salvation stories require willing sacrifices. In Catching Fire, Peeta is the volunteer and the other tributes are sacrifices. They sacrifice themselves to save Katniss, not because she’s Katniss but because she’s the Mockingjay.

Any revolution worth its salt is going to offer an inspiring symbol, like Guy Fawkes mask or Rattlesnake or the Mockingjay. Katniss is comfortable with the role of volunteer and sacrifice, she’s comfortable when she’s the one using her platform to convey a message, like putting flowers around Rue’s grave. But Katniss is not as comfortable with her role as symbol of the valiant Tribute when the Capitol tries to use her in this way. Now she’s the Mockingjay and the District dissidents are willing to sacrifice others to save her. They have plans for her as symbol of the revolution, plans that require sacrifice.

In thinking about the spiritual implications, Jesus as volunteer and sacrifice, as dissident and revolution leader, overturning the system wasn’t His mission. Love was His mission. Jesus wasn’t setting Himself up as a symbol but as a sacrifice. He lived in a brutal and oppressive age but wasn’t teaching His disciples how to stage an uprising, yet the results of His teaching caused revolutionary change. As Katniss is lifted in the helicopter, arms stretched out in the traditional “Christ figure” movie pose, Snow’s granddaughter says, “Someday I want to love like that!” Now there’s a goal worth starting a revolution over.


May 4 2013

On watching Elephant after Rashomon

maureen

May 4

After watching Elephant I felt a little like the priest in Rashomon, which I wrote about yesterday. The event it depicts is enough to shake one’s hope for the future and faith in the goodness of humanity. Elephant is a fictionalized movie about a school shooting inspired by the Columbine school shooting.

Like Rashomon, Elephant tells the story of a school shooting from a variety of students’ perspectives. The title comes from the story about several blind men trying to describe an elephant in which none of them actually can describe the entire beast. The film shows the same event and time period from different characters’ perspectives. It does not sensationalize violence. Roger Ebert said that “Van Sant has made an anti-violence film by draining violence of energy, purpose, glamor, reward and social context.” It was disturbing without being at all thrilling.  Continue reading