Ender’s game and the uncertainty of perception

maureen

Ender’s Game explores reality and assumptions. Ender’s Game explores the consequences that come in attempting to separate the emotional and ethical self from the logical and strategic self. Ender’s choices seem reasonable if his assumptions about the games are true. Characters solve perceived problems using reason and strategy, often putting emotions on hold. The movie made me consider whether emotions are as legitimate a consideration in perception as logic and how perceptions alter reality.

For some reason I want to put Ender’s game in the context of two ideas from physics: the observer effect and the uncertainty principle. The observer effect states that observing a phenomenon alters it. Ender’s point of view, his involvement, the compassion and the creative application of strategy Ender brings to Col. Graff’s game sends its players on a different trajectory and alters the reality they perceive. What is real in a theoretical state is altered every time Ender applies compassion and emotion. In the same way Graff’s paranoia and perceptions concerning the Formics alters the security of earth from their attack.

When Ender views the game through Graff’s eyes something different happens than when he responds based on Valentine’s perceptions or Petra’s. Most of us do not respond to real life situations in a completely dispassionate and logical manner. We factor in our ethics as we lay out our strategies. Our emotions affect the execution of our logically conceived plans.

The uncertainty principle states that increasing the precision in which we measure one quantity (either the position or momentum of a particle) forces the loss of precision in measuring the other. Col. Graff’s games are designed to measure Ender’s strategic capabilities while Maj. Anderson’s explore his emotional state. Major Anderson, a child psychologist charged with evaluating the recruits, has Ender play a game that adapts to his emotional state. Ender alters the game and populates itself with people who matter to him. Reality breaks into the game in a way that Anderson did not plan or expect.

Graff’s game requires Ender to make strategic decisions requiring him to sacrifice people he’s never met. In order to succeed in Graff’s game Ender must separate his emotions from the game and make strategic choices in order to win.  It seems impossible for Ender to meld into a whole self in the games he is playing. The more he is aware of the tension within himself between compassion or strategy, the more difficult it is to achieve a balance.

Perceptions and assumptions also create a reality that may or may not be true. Fear drives the decisions of the International Military in Ender’s Game. Col. Graff fears that the Formics who devastated earth seventy years before will come back and finish it off. Though there has been no activity from the Formics, the defense program continues. The program identifies and recruits children whose gaming abilities indicate talent in military strategy. Those children will be pitted against the Formics in a wargame for the plant.

Ender, like his brother and sister before him is identified. While his brother washed out for being too violent and his sister, for being too compassionate, Ender seems to be the one who is just right. Graff sees this program as earth’s best hope for survival and believes that Ender is the one who will ultimately save the planet from the annihilation he fears. Sacrificing childhood to preserve the planet seems like a logical, perhaps even defensible, strategy if Graff’s assumptions about he future are true.

Who’s perceptions are defining reality and what motives are driving their perceptions? Jesus said that there is no fear in love and that perfect love casts out fear. Fear drives Graff’s perceptions. It alters his version of reality. Even without fear, strategy and perception can only take Ender so far. It is compassion that alters everything and reveals what is real.

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