Lost TV Characters and the Seven Deadly Sins—Will Season 6 Change How We See Them?

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(Other Sinema7 blog posts about Lost are available at http://sinema7.net/tag/lost/)

Lost starts Tuesday. Hopefully some of the questions that have built up over the last five years will be resolved. I recently came across this article from 2008: Get Lost in the Seven Deadly Sins by Amelie Rosseau, on the Lost Media fan site.

And here is a YouTube video called The Seven Deadly Sins of Lost:

I agreed with many of the assessments in these. I think each of the characters, like most of us, have more than one sin that motivates his or her choices. Here is my take on which characters seem to be driven by which sins:

Pride – Benjamin Linus &  Charles Whitmore are in a power struggle for the island. Pride is probably the besetting sin of leadership and power. When someone thinks they know what’s best for other people and is willing to lie, manipulate, and maybe even kill to further his own agenda that’s driven by pride. Jack is prideful, but not even close to being in Ben and Charles’ league. After years of feeling rejected and victimized Locke’s ego has to be stroked by feeling special and chosen. Juliet is just a bit sanctimonious about being right, and she’s pretty sure that she’s right on just about everything. It is ultimately Eko’s pride that drives his unwillingness to repent of his sins which apparently leads to death by smoke monster.

Envy – Jin’s insecurity pushes him toward envy. Charlie struggles with the same sort of thing. He’s jealous for Claire’s attention. He’s trying so hard to restore his image and wants so desperately to be a hero that he tags along with those that might be considered leaders hoping to be identified with them.

Anger – There is a lot of anger going around the island. Locke, Ben & Jack all have anger issues to go with their pride. All three share father issues, past rejections, and the desire to lead. In addition Ana Lucia, Danielle and Sayid each exhibit a strong sense of justice and a willingness to engage in violence to achieve their agendas. Each of them struggles with issues from the past that makes violent revenge satisfying. Sawyer’s passive-aggressive (and hilarious) name-calling and his willingness to take revenge on Locke’s father are both signs of anger. Before turning to the church Eko is a warlord and has no qualms about beating up a few survivors and asking questions later. Sun’s primary motive for  buying controlling interest in her father’s company is revenge.

Sloth – Shannon is the obvious example of sloth but the sin of sloth was originally called acedia and includes depression, sins of omission, and general unwillingness to act, even for one’s own benefit. Weight problem aside, Hurley struggles to deal with the power and opportunity winning the lottery brings. He is generally non-assertive and would rather hide than engage. Desmond is willing to sit in the hatch and push the button for years, but ditches his first fiancé Ruth to run away to the monastery then later runs away from Penny because her daddy called him a failure.

Greed  – Greed is certainly a driving motive for Sawyer, based not only on his career choice but on his hoarding of supplies. Michael’s greed is not so much for material comfort as to his willingness to sacrifice others to advance his self interests, though he does return in a failed rescue, risking his life for his fellow passengers. Pre-crash Kate not only murdered her step-father but robbed a bank. Before coming to the island Miles stole money and tries to cut a deal to keep the secret that Ben is alive in exchange for a few million dollars.

Lust – Kate seems to have a bit of a problem here, flip flopping between Jack and Sawyer. Sawyer has his own issues with lust evidenced by how easily he’s seduced by Ana Lucia and by his career as a confidence man/gigolo. Before landing on the island Sun has an affair but reconciles with Jin on the island.

Gluttony – Obviously Hurley has a weight issue. He hoarded food and ate out of the stores intended to be shared. Charlie’s problem with cocaine comes from this same place. He hid his coke in a tree in case he might need it. Both Jack and his father Christian turned to alcohol when life got too hard. Dependency on a substance, and over use of that substance for emotional support whether it’s food, drugs, or booze is gluttony.

I am anxious to see how their stories resolve, who overcomes his or her demons and who turns out to be the hero or villain, or whether it turns out that everyone is a little bit of both, even Ben.


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